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You are here: Home Physiology I Parvalbumin expressing interneurons control spike-phase coupling of hippocampal cells to theta oscillations
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Parvalbumin expressing interneurons control spike-phase coupling of hippocampal cells to theta oscillations

Strüber M, Sauer JF, Bartos M (2022)

May 19, 2022

Abstract

Encoding of information by hippocampal neurons is defined by the number and the timing of action potentials generated relative to ongoing network oscillations in the theta (5-14 Hz), gamma (30-80 Hz) and ripple frequency range (150-200 Hz). The exact mechanisms underlying the temporal coupling of action potentials of hippocampal cells to the phase of rhythmic network activity are not fully understood. One critical determinant of action potential timing is synaptic inhibition provided by a complex network of Gamma-amino-hydroxy-butyric acid releasing (GABAergic) interneurons. Among the various GABAergic cell types, particularly Parvalbumin-expressing cells are powerful regulators of neuronal activity. Here we silenced Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in hippocampal areas CA1 and the dentate gyrus in freely moving mice using the optogenetic silencing tool eNpHR to determine their influence on spike timing in principal cells. During optogenetic inhibition of Parvalbumin-expressing cells, local field potential recordings revealed no change in power or frequency of CA1 or dentate gyrus network oscillations. However, CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited significantly reduced spike-phase coupling to CA1 theta, but not gamma or ripple oscillations. These data suggest that hippocampal Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons are particularly important for an intact theta-based temporal coding scheme of hippocampal principal cell populations.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35079030/

 

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